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Publication numberUS2617330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date11 Nov 1952
Filing date10 Mar 1948
Priority date10 Mar 1948
Publication numberUS 2617330 A, US 2617330A, US-A-2617330, US2617330 A, US2617330A
InventorsEmery Pataki
Original AssigneeReconstruction Finance Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ammunition booster
US 2617330 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATAKI 2,617,330 AMMUNITION BOOSTER 3 Sheets-'Sheet 1 INVENToR. Emery Pataki L: V i y Nov. II, 1952 Filed March l0, 1948 Nov. 11, 1952 E. PATAKI 2,617,330

AMMUNITION BOOSTER Filed March l0, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. mer Pa'akz Www,

Nov. 11, 1952 E.- PATAKI 2,617,330

AMMUNITION BOOSTER Filed March l0, 1948 3 SheetSSheet 5 INVENToR. Emery Pataki Patented Nov. 11, 1952 UNITED sinies- 'r ortica m'esne assignments, to Reconstruction Finance Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of the UnitedStates Application. March I0, 1948, Serial No. 13,992r

9- Claims).V 1 c,

This invention relates to ammunition boosters adapted to assist in feeding ammunition to a machine gun' mounted upon an airplane or other armed vehicle.

It has been proposed heretofore4` tol provide a motor driven sprocket for acting upon the ammunition carried by aloaded ammunition belt tofassist in feeding the belt with its ammunition to a machine gun. In accordance the priorl proposal the motor was toY be arranged Jcooperate' constantly so long as the firing" circuit was closed and was to be connected to' drive the booster sprocket continuously,v so long as the motor continued in operation.

A booster designed for operationupon this principle has to be adjusted to the speed of' operation of' the particular gun, and even then is aptto get out of order, because when the belt is long and heavyth-e load is apt to-` be too great, and when the belt' is' short and light the delivery force of the ammunition tothe gun and the rate'` of booster: feed are likely to be too great'.

The presen-t invention has for its primary ob*- jeet to' provide an ammunition booster comprising a motor and a sprocket driven byV the motor,

in which there is' noneed to acl-justv the booster' operation to the firing rateof the gun and in which the force and rate of delivery of the ammunition to the gun are, without' preliminary adjustment, automatically maintained within safe and proper limits.

To these ends' it is a salient feature of the present invention that" the booster is operated from a drive motor through a clutch, and that the ammunition belt is carried forward from the booster sprocket to the gun'` over a belt' engaging control' member for the clutch.v When the bel't between the booster and the gun is suciently slack it rests upon the control member and causes the clutch to be disengaged', thereby breaking the connection between the motor and the sprocket. As the normal gun ieed mech. anism continues to act upon the ammunition carried by the belt,l the slack between the boosterI and the gun is reduced. reduces the weight upon the control member and. causes the clutch to be reengaged, thereby reestablishing. the. drive of the sprocket by the motor. The booster sproclixet,y when in operation, advancesthe belty more rapidly than the belt is advanced by the feeding mechanism. of the gun, so that the amount of slack is increased by the sprocket, and the clutch is again disabled. The booster is thus intermittently actuated by the continuously rund ning motor to advance the ammunition, at the relative to the idle drive shaft;

2 same average rate at which the ammunition isadvanced by the gun itself. l

With this kind of arrangement the booster can never overfeed. At the same time it can be designed to prov'id'e sufficient power tov` operate sue-- cessfu'lly under all normal conditions. The load imposed upon the normal ammunition feevsling,v mechanism of the gun is automatically held within strict limits;

It is desirable when loading the gun to be able to advance the ammunition booster by' manual operation, but at-the same time to prevent retrograde movement ofV the booster'. To this end the drive is transmitted from the clutch to a drive sha-ft' upon which a brake is operative,- and the brake is-` made responsive to the clutch control member so that the brake and clutch arev alternatively effective; A one-way ratchet clutch isl desirably provided between the drive shaft and the booster sprocket, the clutch bei-ng' de signed to drive the sprocketforward and to permit forward operation of the sprocket: relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle, but not the reverse operation of the sprocket It an objeet'- of the present invention to adapt the booster for right-hand or left-hand installation and for endwise reversal. With these objects in view the booster motor Visconstructed and arranged soI that` it may be con-- Venientl-y installed for' rotation in either one di# rection or the other. Instead of providing al singleone-way' clutch between the drive shaft and thev sprocket, two such clutches are provided, the one for eiiectin-g the drivel when the motor is operated in one direction and the other for eiie'cting the drive when the motor is operated in the opposite direction. i

The clutches, which are desirably toothed clutches, are individually manually adjustable' to effective and ineffective positions, but normally the adjusting means forl one or the other of the clutches is disabled so as tov assure' the retention of' that clutch in an inoperative condi# tion. Tl're` clutch which is' permitted toy remain operative is selected in accordance with thedirection of motor operation', so as 12o-permit' manual operation of thel sprocket in the direction' t'oA advance the ammunition toward the gun whilen preventing retrograde movement of the sprocket.

When, itis desired to operatev` tnesprocket bacia' ward, however, the effective toothed clutch 'can bev temporarily shifted' to inactive position.v

As has been indicated, it isaiso an'ohject of" the invention to' enable "the booster to be reversed end for end so as to improve the adaptability of the device for varying installations. The booster sprocket comprises a rotatable sleeve having a pair of sprocket gears mounted upon it. One of the sprocket gears has the gaps between its teeth formed to engage and coact with the ammunition shells, and the other has the gaps between the teeth of smaller radius to coact with the projectiles. The two sprocket gears, however, have equal numbers of teeth and are of the same internal diameter, being adapted to be interchangeably mounted upon the sprocket cylinder.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the drawing forming part of this specification:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary view in sectional elevation of a booster sprocket which forms part of a practical and advantageous illustrative form of booster mechanism embodying features of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view in elevation of the booster mechanism of Fig. 1 as seen from the left-hand end of that figure;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken upon the line 3 3 of Fig. l looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken upon the line 4-4 of Fig. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view in end elevation of the booster mechanism shown in Fig. 1 as seen from the right-hand end of that figure;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken upon the line 6-6 of Fig. 4 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. '7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken upon the line 1-1 of Fig. 4 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 8 is a view in rear elevation of a machine gun having the ammunition booster and ammunition chute of the present invention combined therewith; and

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic View illustrating the circuits of the booster motor and the magnetic clutch.

Reference will rst be had to Fig. 8. In this view disclosure is made of a machine gun and gun mount indicated generally by I, an ammunition booster 2, and an ammunition chute 3 disposed between the booster and the gun through which the ammunition belt 4, which includes the ammunition itself, is advanced from the booster to the gun. It is to be understood, of course, that the machine gun itself includes the usual ammunition feeding mechanism, and that the booster is provided in installations where the Weight and length of the ammunition belt make auxiliary feeding means desirable.

The booster 2, Fig. 1, comprises a rotatable sprocket sleeve 5 having external bosses or collars 6 and 1 provided upon it for seating sprockets 8 and 9, respectively. Series of ears I and II are provided in association with the collars 6 and 1 for attaching the sprocket gears 8 and 9 in place. The attachment is effected through screws I2 which are passed through the ears and clamped in place by nuts I3. The sprockets 8 and 9 are adapted to coact, respectively, with the shells and projectiles of cartridges. The sprockets are interchangeably mounted upon lthe flanges 6 and 1 so that the booster can be pointed in either direction relative to the gun as desired.. The sleeve is rotatably mounted through ball bearings I4 and I5 upon stationary end plates I6 and I1. Threaded bores I8 and I9 are provided in the external faces of the plates I6 and I1 for the reception of mounting screws.

The plate I6 is connected through screws 20 to a motor housing end plate 2| which is disposed interiorly of the sleeve 5, insulating plates 22 and 23 being interposed between the blocks I6 and 2I. One end of the armature shaft 24 is supported in a ball bearing 25 carried by the plate 2 I. The plate 2I is secured to a motor casing 2S by means of screws 21. An insulating ring 28 is secured in the sleeve 26 by means of screws 29. Metallic sleeves 36 carried by the ring 28 constitute holders or guideways for commutator brushes 3| which are urged by springs 32 toward the commutator of the motor armature 33.

The armature shaft 24 is supported at its opposite end in a ball bearing 4I which is carried by a stationary plate 42, the plate being secured in the stationary sleeve 26 by screws 43. The plate 42 is composed of a highly permeable ferromagnetic material for a purpose which will be hereinafter explained.

A further stationary plate 44 is fitted within v the right-hand end of the sleeve 28 and carries a ball bearing 45 in which a drive shaft 45 is mounted. The plate 44 is secured by screws 41 to a stationary block 48. The block 48 is connected by screws 49 with the end plate I1.

The sleeve 26 has secured to it by screws 50 an inner sleeve 5I. The inner sleeve 5I in turn is secured by screws 52 to a frame structure 53 by which motor eld windings 54 and 55 are carried.

The motor armature shaft 24 has affixed to the right-hand end thereof a driving disc 56 which is adapted through the medium of a friction disc clutch 51 to transmit rotation to a drive shaft 45 through which the sprocket sleeve 5 is driven. The clutch 51 is located within a core member 56 upon which an electromagnet winding 59 is carried. Alternate discs of the clutch 51 are splined to a sleeve 60 which is affixed to the driving disc 56. The other alternate discs of the clutch are splined to a sleeve member 6I which is, in turn, splined to the drive shaft `46.

A compression coil spring 62 is interposed between a nut 63, threaded on the drive shaft, and a radial wall of the sleeve 6I. The spring urges the sleeve 6I away from the drive disc 55 when the electromagnet is not energized, thereby rendering the clutch 51 ineffective. When the electromagnet is energized, however, the core 58 is drawn to the left toward the fixed plate 42 and acts to move with it by means of a bearing 6Ia, the sleeve 6I, so that the discs of the clutch 51 are pressed toward the drive disc 56 and are clamped firmly in engagement with one another to drive the shaft 46 from the disc 56.

When the electromagnet is de-energized the core 58 is forced toward the right by the spring 62 and causes the discs of another clutch 64 to be pressed firmly together. The clutch 64 comprises a pair of discs splined to the shaft 46 and an intervening disc splined to the non-rotary core member 58. When this last mentioned clutch isrendered effective therefore by the rearward movement of the core 58, it serves as a brake for arresting rotation of the drive shaft 46 and holding the drive shaft against unintended rotation. The core member 58 is guided in its axial movements and is held against rotationY by guide pins 65 (one shown) which are affixed to the core member and slidably received in bores 66 formed inthe stationary plate 44. l

lternative clutch and gear trains are provided for" transmitting' motion from the drive shaft 46' tov the sprocket sleeve 5. These clutch and gear trains are intended to be employedy alternatively according to the direction in which the motor armature is rotated. The two trains arey il-lustrated respectively in Figures 6- and 7 and are duplicates of one another, saver for a single de tail which will be specifically pointed out at an appropriate point. l

The drive shaft 46 carries' a pinion 61- which meshes with and drives' a gear 61 I` fast upon Aan intermediate shaft 612. The shaft 12 has formed upon it a pinion 613 which meshes with and drives the input gears' (i8 and 68a, ofthe two trains. Since the two trains aresol nearly dup*- licates of one another, the* train embodying the gear 68 will be described, and no specific descrip tion will be given the' train embodying gear 68a. Corresponding" reference numerals will, however, be applied tocorresponding parts of the latter' train with the subscript al added in each instance. i

The gear 68 is revoluble uponV a shaft 69 and bears against a split ring 69| which is sprung into a circumferential groove' 692 of the shaft. The shaft SAS is supported at its left-hand end inI a ball bearing 'I0 carried by the plate 44, and at its right-hand end in a roller bearing 'lillv carried by theplate l1. The gear 68 is formed with a circular ange portion 'H which is internally splined toa disc`12. The disc 12 is slidably7 mounted upon the shaft E9 and is urged' away' from the body of the' gear 68 by a compression coill spring I3 which is interposed between the disc and the gear body. 'I'he disc 'l2 has av toothed hub portion 14, the teeth of which are adapted to intert with complementary teeth formedv on a hub portion of a gear 16, the gear 'Hi being fast upon ther shaft 69. It willl be apparent that the toothed' hubs of the disc 12 andthe gear T6 form a toothed clutch adapted to transmitdrive from the gear 68 to the gear 16 for one direction -of rotation of the gear 68 but not for the opposite direction of rotation of the gear.

The train comprising the gear 68 is' designed to-beused only when the direction of motor drive is suchthat the top teeth of the gear 6-8 travel toward the observer as theA parts are viewed in Fig'. 6-. Thet'rain comprising the gear 68a is intended to be used only when the motor drive is in the opposite direction, that is to say when the teeth at the top of 68a travel awav from the observer as the parts are-viewed'- in Fig. 7. As` the parts are observed in' Fig. 4, theY train comprising gear S8 is utilized for transmitting' clockwise rotation to theV sprocket sleeve 5 and the train comprising gear' 68a is utilized for transmitting counter-clockwise rotation to the sprocket sleeve 5T. The' gears 16 and 16a mesh with an internal gear 8 which is secured to the sprocket sleeve 5 bv screws 82.

The disc 12 is engaged by a clutch shifting fork 83 which isV pivotly mounted uponL apin 84- and which is urged toward the right by the spring 73 acting through the disc T2, A fork operating rod 85 is slidably mounted in the plate i7 and is'provided with an operating handle 86" disposed atthe outer or right-hand side of the plate Il. The r'od 85 is providedwith a cross pin 8T which is adaptedl to rest in a shallow recess 88 of thev plate Il when holding the fork 83 in clutch disengaging position against the forceof spring 13.

In order to permit the fork to moveV rearward and enable the clutch members to become engagedwith one another, the rod 85`- is first thrust 67 forward to move" the pin- 8l clear of the notch. 88 and is then turned through a righ-t angle to align the pin 81 with a`- deeper"v notch 8?. The deeper notch 859 isz not; shown' i-rr Fig. 6i, but the corresponding' not-ch ci the duplicate mecharsmof Fig. 7 is show-n' at 89a. The pin 81' is shownas resting in the' notch 89u' i-n Fig". 7, so that' theclu-tch parts' are illustrated inthat' i'gure` in' en# gage'd or drivingrelat'ion.

While it wou-ld dono harm for both toothed" clutches to be engaged simultaneously, there no utility in having them engagedl simultaneously' and such' simultaneous engagement wouldresult in unnecessary noise and unnecessary wear' o-f the r parts. l Provision' is accordingly made ofl an` interlock device atthe outer side of the plate Il which may be adj-'usted to permit either' of' the handles 8`6- and 85a to' be'- operated between the clutchenga-ging and? clutch releasing posi; tions,- butl which will never permit both of the handles to be operated simultaneously to clutch".

engaging positions.

The interlock device com-prises a slotted arm Si' (Fig. 5') through which a headed screw 92 is passed. The arm l rests upon a pair` oi spaced earsf 93, and the screw extends down be| tween the ears. A- cla-inping nut 94 is threaded on the screw and may be tightened against the' under' side of` the ears 9'@ to; clamp`v the bar' 13 against the upper side of the ears. The bar' may be adJ'i-istejd to a position like' that shown in Fig. 5l which thez handle 86' is operable be# tween clutching and declutching positions butthe handle 86a is compelled to remain in its dec1`utching position.

vThe position of the interlock bar 91 can bechanged by first operating the handle 86- to declu-tching position, loosening the nut 954g sliding the bar SI1 aci-oss'to li'e beneathI the handle 8:8 butto clear the handle 86a, and again tightening the nuff.

The electromagnetic' clutch coil 59 is' made" subject, during continuous running of the motor, to the` control of a slack switch 9? which is arranged tcbe controlled by that portion of the ammunition belt which extends from the booster sprocket 2 over to the gun l. This portion ofl the' belt iscaused to travel through. an. ammuniz tionchute3l, the floor portion of which is; d'e sii-ably curved to coincide substantially with' a catenary which would normally be formed by the freely suspended belt. The floor 98 of the chute 3 comprises, at the lowestv portion thereof, a hinged section 9'9 which is free to move down-` ward under the weight of the belt', but' which -1s urged upward by aI spring |00 which actsl through a switch member' IDl.

When there is enough slack in' the belt be-A tween the sprocket and the gunv to cause the oor member 99 to push the switch memberL HHv down4l to 'av circuit breaking position, the magnet clutch coi-l 59 is dee'nergized, and causes the drive shaft to be disconnected from the drive disc 5'6 and to be arrested by the action of the braking clutch 66. The booster sprocket isaccordingly' brought to rest promptly whenever the switch member lB-l ismovedto circuit' breaking position.

So long as the gun" is ring, however, the ammunition feed mechanism of the gun itself co`n-- tinues to operate and to draw ammunition from the slack portion of the belt that has already passed the booster sprocket. This reduces the length of the slack belt between the sprocket and thegun, causing the belt to be lifted away from the movable floor section 99 of the ammunition chute, and hence enabling the switch member to be returned to circuit closing position by the action of the spring |00.

As soon as the switch member |0| again closes the circuit of the clutch coil 59, the motor, which has continued to run, is again connected to drive the booster sprocket. The booster sprocket, when set into operation, always gains upon the ammunition feeding mechanism of the gun and hence the sprocket is caused automatically to be started and stopped at short intervals during the operation of the gun and motor as the switch member |0| is alternately opened and closed.

It has been mentioned that the gear and clutch trains comprising the gear 68 and 68a are alternatively utilized depending upon the direction of rotation of the motor armature 33. The electric connections to the motor and to the clutch coil 59 are shown in Fig. 9, which figure should be read in conjunction with the Fig. 3.

A line conductor connected to the positive terminal of a direct current source is connected to a terminal block |06 which is mounted on but insulated from the motor housing plate 2|. A line conductor |01 runs from the negative terminal of the same direct current source to a terminal block |03 which is mounted upon but insulated from the motor housing plate 2 Additional terminal blocks |09 and ||0 are mounted upon but insulated from the motor housing plate 2|.

A master switch (not shown) is desirably provided for the motor in one of the line conductors |05, |01. This switch may advantageously be arranged to be opened and closed, respectively, concurrently with the opening and the making ready of the gun firing circuit.

As will be seen from an examination of Fig. 9, the slack switch and magnet clutch circuit may be traced out from line conductor |05 through a conductor switch 91, conductor ||2, terminal block |50, conductor ||3, winding 59, conductor ||4, and terminal block |08 to line conductor |01.

The motor is of the compound type, having the field 54 disposed in shunt with the armature 33 and neld 55 disposed in series with the armature 33. The circuit of the shunt field 54 may be traced from line conductor |05 through terminal block |06, conductor ||5, field Winding 54, conductor H6, and terminal block |08 to line conductor |01.

The circuit through the series winding 55 may be traced from line conductor |05 through terminal block |06, conductor |1, arma-ture 33, conductor H0, terminal block |09, conductor ||9,

field winding 55, conductor |20, and terminal block |08 to line conductor |01. This is the full line circuit illustrated in Fig. 9.

If it is desired to change the direction of rotation of the motor armature, the direction of current flow through the armature is simply reversed. This is done by crossing conductors ||1 and ||8 as illustrated in dash lines in Fig. 9. The conductor ||1 is disconnected from terminal block |05 and is connected as illustrated by dash line Illa to terminal block |09. Conductor ||B is at the same time disconnected from terminal block |09 and is connected as illustrated by dash line ||8a to terminal block |06.

Now the circuit from line conductor |05 through the armature and the series connected neld 55 is traced out through terminal block |05, conductor H2, as indicated by the portion Ha. armature 33, conductor H1, as indicated by the portion lila, terminal block |09, conductor H9, field winding 55, conductor |20, and terminal block |08 to line conductor |01. The circuit is precisely the saine as before with the exception that the direction of current now through the armature has been reversed by the reversal of the connections of the conductors ||1 and ||8.

It is to be understood, of course, that the direction of motor rotation chosen for a particular installation is never altered. It is not therefore necessary, nor desirable, to make the provision for reversal of direction so readily accessible as to facilitate tampering by unskilled and unauthorized persons. In order, however, that reasonably easy access may be had to the terminal blocks provided upon the plate 2|, the end plate |6 is formed with an opening |2| through it, and this opening is normally covered by a plate |22 which is removably secured to plate I5 by screws |23.

When the direction of motor rotation has been settled upon, as determined by the relation of the booster to the'gun which is physically most convenient in a particular instance, the interlock bar 9| is set to disable the clutch controlled by the handle 86 or 86a' which ought not be rendered effective for the direction of motorrotation which has been chosen. The sprockets 8 and 9 are then checked to make sure that they are mounted consistently with the orientation of the booster sleeve 5 with relation to the gun which has been chosen. If the sprockets 8 and S are not found to be properly disposed they are interchanged in the manner which has been already pointed out.

The handle or 86a which is not disabled by the interlock bar 9| may be operated to disable the clutch controlled by it when desired, as, for example, if it should become necessary to feed the belt backward past the sprocket.

I have described what I believe to be the best embodiment of my invention. I do not wish, however, to be confined to the embodiment shown, but what I desire to cover by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An ammunition booster for advancing a loaded ammunition belt toward a machine gun having ammunition feeding instrumentalities. said booster comprising a feed sprocket, a constantly running drive motor, a drive shaft for the sprocket, a driving clutch interposed'between the motor and the drive shaft, a brake associated with the drive shaft, a clutch operating member operable to render the clutch and the brake effective alternatively, an electromagnet contro-lling the clutch operating member, and a slack switch in circuit with the electromagnet comprising a belt engaging member, the construction and arrangement being such that the electromagnet circuit is opened to cause the brake to be eilective when the belt slack between the sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount and to cause the clutch to be effective when the belt slack is reduced below such amount.

2. An ammunition booster for advancing a loaded ammunition belt toward a machine gun when set up in any one of a plurality of relations to the gun, said booster having ammunition feeding instrumentalities, and comprising a feed sprocket, a constantly running drive motor adaptedfor operation in one direction or the other according to the disposition of the booster in relation to the gun, a drive shaft for the sprocket, a drive clutch interposed between the motor and the drive shaft, a slack responsive clutch controlling member engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and the gun for causing the clutch to befrenderedineifectivewhen the belt slack'between the sprocket and the gun exceeds aV predetermined amount and. to be-rendered effective when the belt slack is reduced below` such amnunt, a pair" of one-way clutch and gear' trains interposedy between the drive shaft and the sprocket and adapted to be used selectivelyr accordingv tor the direction of drive shaft operation, the one for driving the sprocket in one direction from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket to be turned manually in that direction relative to thev drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle, andthe other for driving the sprocket in the opposite. direction from the drive shaf-ty while permitting the sprocket to be turnedA manually inthe latter direction relative tothe drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle.

3. An. ammunition booster for advancing. a loaded. ammunition belt toward a machine gun when. set up in any one of a plurality of relations: toL the gun, saidv booster having ammuni tionY feeding instrumentalities, and comprising a feed sprocket. a constantly running drive motor adapted for operation in one direction or the other .according to the disposition of the booster in relation to the gun, a dri-ve shaft for the sprocket, a drive clutchinterposed between the motor and the drive shaft, a. slack responsive clutchA controlling member engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and the gun for causing theclutch to-be rendered ineffective when' the belt slack between the sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount and to berendered effective when the belt slack is reduced below such amount, a brake operative on the drive shaft and controlled by the slack responsive member to be ineffective when the clutchA is effective and to be eiective to prevent retrograde rotation of the drive shaft when the clutch-.is rendered ineffective, av pair of one-Way clutch andy gear trains interposed between the driveshaft andthe sprocket adapted to be used selectively according to the direction of drive shaft operation, the` one: for driving. the sprocket inone direction from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket to be turned manually in that direction only relative to the drive shaft, when the drive shaft is idle; and the other for driving the sprocket in the opposite direction from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket to' be turned manually in the latter direction only relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle.

e; An ammunition booster forV advancing a loaded ammunition belt toward a. machine gun when set up in any one of a plurality of relations to the gun, said booster having ammunition feeding instrumentalities, and comprising a feed sprocket, a constantly running drive motor adapted for operation in one direction or the other according to the disposition of the booster in relation to 'the gun, a drive shaft for the sprocket, a drive clutch interposed between the motor and the drive shaft, a slack responsive clutch controlling member engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and the gun for causing the clutch to be rendered ineffective when the belt slack between the sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount and to be rendered effective when the belt slack is reduced below such amount, a brake operative on the drive shaft and controlled by the slack responsive member to be ineffective when the clutch is effective and to be effective to prevent retrograde rotation of the drive shaft when the clutch is rendered ineffective, apair of one-way clutch. and gear trains interposed between. the drive shaft and: the sprocket adaptedv to be used selectively according to thel direction ofdrive shaft operation, the one for drivingI the'sprocket in one direction from thel drive shaft. while permitting the sprocket to be turned manually in that direction only relative to the drive shaft, whenY the: drive shaft is idle. and 'the other for drivingl the sprocket` in the oppositedirection from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket. to be turned manually in the latter direction only relative to thev drive shaft when the drive. shaft is idle,` and manually operable controllersv for the respectivey one-wayv clutches, each settable tov render active or inactive the one-way clutch with which itis: associated.

5; An ammunition booster forV advancing a loadedv ammunition belt toward a machine gun when set up in.y any one ofl a plurality of' relations to the gung. said: booster having ammunition feedingA instrumentalities,. and comprising" a feedV sprocket, a constantly running drive. motor adapted for operation in one. direction or the other according to the disposition. of theA booster in` relation to the gun, a'. drivek shaft for the sprocket. a drive clutch interposed` between the motorV and theY drive shaft, a: slack responsive clutchk controlling member engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and. the gun for causing, the clutch tobe rendered inefl fectivee when: the belt slack between the; sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount' and to biel rendered effective' when the belt slack isreduced. below such amount, a brake. operative on the; drive. shatt': and controlled by the slack responsive member to be ineffective when theclutch is effective and to be. effective. to prevent retrograde rotation of the drivelshaft. when the clutch. is rendered ineffective',` a pair of one-way clutch. and; gear trains interposed between the drive shaft and the sprocket adapted to be used' selectively accordingv to the direction of drive; shaft operation; the one for driving the sprocket'- inone direction from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket to be turnedv manually in that direction only' relative tothe drive shaft, when the drive shaft is idle, andthe other forl driving; the sprocket in the opposite direction from. the drive shaft. while permitting the sprocket tol be turned manually in the latter* direction only relative to the drive shaft when the drive'` shaft is` idle, manually operable controllers forV the respective one-way clutches, each settabley to render active or inactive the one-way clutch with which it is associated; and an interlock member so mounted with respect to the one- Way clutch controllers that at all times at least one or the other of the controllers must remain in position to render its associated one-way clutch inactive, said interlock member being operable between two positions in one of which one of the one-way clutches is compelled to remain inactive while the other may be rendered active or inactive and in the other of which the other of the cnc-way clutches is compelled to remain inactive while the first may be rendered active or inactive.

6. An ammunition booster adapted for endwise reversal comprising, in combination, a drive motor, a sleeve containing the motor, said sleeve having a pair of sprocket gears fast upon it, the one constructed and arranged for cooperating with the ammunitionshells and the other for cooperating zwith the projectiles which are of ll smaller diameter than the shells, said sleeve being provided with identical mounting parts for the two gears, and the gears being formed for interchangeable mounting on the sleeve.

7. An ammunition booster adapted for advancing a loaded ammunition belt toward a machine gun when set up in any one of a plurality of relations to the gun, said booster having ammunition' feeding instrumentalities, and comprising-a feed sprocket, a constantly running drive motor adaptable for operation in one direction or the other according to the disposition of the booster in relation to the gun, a drive shaft for the sprocket, an electromagnetic clutch interposed between the motor and the drive shaft, a slack responsive clutch controlling switch engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and the gun for causing the clutch to be rendered ineffective when the belt slack between the sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount and to be rendered effective when the belt slack is reduced below such amount, a brake operative on the drive shaft and controlled by the slack switch to be ineffective when the electromagnetic clutch is effective and to be effective when the electromagnetic clutch is ineffective, a pair of one-way clutch and gear trains interposed between the drive shaft and the sprocket, adapted to be used selectively according to the direction of drive shaft operation, the one for driving the sprocket in one direction from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket to be turned manually in that direction only relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle, and the other for driving the sprocket in the opposite direction from the drive shaft while permitting the sprocket to be turned manually in the latter direction only relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle.

8. An ammunition booster for advancing a loaded ammunition belt toward a machine gun having ammunition feeding instrumentalities, said booster comprising a feed sprocket, a constantly running drive motor, a drive shaft for the sprocket, a clutch interposed between the motor and the sprocket, a brake operative on the drive shaft, a slack responsive clutch controlling member engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and the gun for causing the drive to be interrupted when the belt slack between the sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount and to be reestablished when the belt slack is reduced below such amount, said slack responsive member serving also to render the drive shaft brake effective when the clutch is rendered ineffective, and to render said brake ineffective when the clutch is rendered effective, and a one-Way clutch and gear train between the drive shaft and the sprocket constructed and arranged to drive the sprocket from the drive shaft when the drive shaft is in operation and to permit the sprocket to be turned manually in the same direction relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle, said one-Way clutch and gear train serving also to prevent retrograde movement of the sprocket relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle.

9. An ammunition booster for advancing a loaded ammunition belt toward a machine gun having ammunition feeding instrumentalities, said booster comprising a feed sprocket, a constantly running drive motor, a drive shaft for the sprocket, a clutch interposed between the motor and the sprocket, a brake operative on the drive shaft, a slack responsive clutch controlling member engageable with the ammunition belt between the sprocket and the gun for causing the drive shaft to be interrupted when the belt slack between the sprocket and the gun exceeds a predetermined amount and to be reestablished when the belt slack is reduced below such amount, said slack responsive member serving also to render the drive shaft brake effective when the clutch is rendered ineffective, and to render said brake ineffective when the clutch is rendered effective, and a one-way clutch and gear train between the drive shaft and the sprocket constructed and arranged to drive the sprocket from the drive shaft when the drive shaft is in operation and to permit the sprocket to be turned manually in the same direction relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle, said one-way clutch and gear train serving also to prevent retrograde movement of the sprocket relative to the drive shaft when the drive shaft is idle, and a controller through which the one-way clutch can be set in engaged or disengaged condition at will.

EMERY PATAKI.

REFERENCES CITED rlhe following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,364,309 North Dec. 5, 1944' 2,372,750 Tompkins et al. Apr. 3, 1945 2,396,136 Trotter Mar. 5, 1946 2,403,170 `Chapman et al July 2, 1946 2,428,414 Elliott Oct. '7, 1947 2,557,441 Kornblum June 19, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2364309 *12 May 19425 Dec 1944Boulton Aircraft LtdMeans for feeding ammunition belts to machine guns
US2372750 *12 May 19423 Apr 1945Boulton Aircraft LtdFriction clutch
US2396136 *14 Nov 19415 Mar 1946Bell Aircraft CorpOrdnance
US2403170 *29 Nov 19412 Jul 1946North American Aviation IncAmmunition feed booster
US2428414 *13 Jun 19417 Oct 1947Glenn L Martin CoMachine gun feed
US2557441 *1 May 194419 Jun 1951Harvey Machine Co IncFeed for guns or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2756636 *18 Jul 195031 Jul 1956Hughes Tool CoAdjustable ammunition booster sprockets
US2823588 *6 Apr 195518 Feb 1958Hipsley William BAmmunition booster
US2843021 *1 Dec 195215 Jul 1958Garrett CorpAmmunition booster with torque limiting device
US2873649 *9 Dec 195517 Feb 1959Brevets Aero MecaniquesFeed devices for automatic guns supplied with ammunition in the from of a cartridge belt
US3296930 *23 Feb 196510 Jan 1967Rocha John GClutch-lock for externally powered firearm feeding mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/33.5, 198/524
International ClassificationF41A9/00, F41A9/51
Cooperative ClassificationF41A9/51
European ClassificationF41A9/51