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Publication numberUS2436404 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date24 Feb 1948
Filing date27 May 1942
Priority date27 May 1942
Publication numberUS 2436404 A, US 2436404A, US-A-2436404, US2436404 A, US2436404A
InventorsSlate Claude C
Original AssigneeHughes Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ammunition booster for automatic guns
US 2436404 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1948. c. c. SLATE 2,436,404

AMMUNITION BOQSTER FOR AUTOMATIQ GUNS Filed May 27, 1942 Mu awn 6 CLAUDE C. 51,147:

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*Patentecl Feb. 24, 1948 Claude C; Slate, "Burbank'NCalifl .assig'nor to Hughes Tool Company, Houston, Tex.-, a corporation of Delaware Application May it, 19423 sea no. 444355 13 Claims. (oi. te -3e) My invention relates to means for controlling the feeding and firing of automatic guns. While the invention is particularly applicable to ma chine guns and will be so described herein for the purpose of illustration, it may also be adapted to heavier guns of the automatic-type.

A machine gun operated under remote con trol, for example, a machine gun on an airplane, is commonly supplied by an ammunition belt that travels from an ammunition magazine through a feed chute. In the usualarran'gement both the energy required to actuate the firing mechanism and the energy required to movev the ammunition belt from the magazine tothe gun are derived from the explosive in the cartrides of the ammunition belt. Considerable energy is required to move an ammunition belt because; in the first place, the ag regate weight of, a belt of ammunition is substantial, in the second place, considerable friction is involved both within the belt structure" and between the belt and the chute, and, in the third place, because considerable inertia must be overcome continually in movingthe belt in the characteristically intermittent manner. v

The burdening of the firing mechanism of the gun with the function of a prime mover inevitably, lessens the rate of firing. A more serious con-- sideration is that jams; r'riisfires, and failures to fire with attendant delay and confusion result" from the additional load tin the gun mechanism.

It is a general object of the presentinvention to release the gun mechanismto a substantial extent, if not entirely, of the task of conveying ammunition to the firing mechanism. This object is attained by a power-actuated booster.'

With reference to the power-actuated booster; another object o'fthe invention is to provide an arrangement in which energization of the booster and operation of the gun firing mechanism are automatically synchronized.

In the preferred practice of the invention I employ a motor to energize the booster, and furtherspecific objects of the invention relate to problems involved in the use of a motor for this purpose. One of these specific objects is to provide a driving connection between the motor and the booster that will cause the booster to be actuated by the motor and yetipermits the ammu nition belt to'move intermittently while the motor operates continuously.- Another of these specific objects is to provide an arrangement by virtue of which the motor stores up energy while the ammunition'belt is momentarily stationary",- which energy is released to favor rapid acceleration onthe next advance of the ammunition belt, Still another of-these specific objects :is to provide a rhotor-driven booster thatwill not impose-the load oi -a-dead motor on the firing mechanism when themotor fails". i.-

g The above and further. objects and advantages of-the-invention will be apparent in thefollowi ng detailed description, taken with the accompany- ---In-the-dra wing', which is to be considered as illustrative only:

-Fi gi 1 is-a sid'e elevation Ora prefer-red form of my invention combined witha machine gun;

2 is a-Wiring-diag'ramof a =oircuit employed in the arrangement'shown in Fig. 1 Y "Big.- 3. is an enlarged view in cross section taken as ihdi'eatgdby the line 3 3 rrig. 1;;ana Fig. 4 is a section taken on the line 4-4 or The drawing shows the usual ammunition box generally designated in and alnamr'n'unition chute I l leading from the ammunition box to the firing mechanism l2 of; a machine gun- I3.- The machine gun is remotely controlled by a push-5 button switch l5 which ma be lbca'ted on'the pilot s control stick in the usual manner From the push-button switch J5 an electric cable 16 eg'rten'ds to a solenoid-operated mechanism H and; the g'iu'i is adapted to fire continually whenever the solenoid-op'erated mechanism is energized.- -=The ammunition bo'x Ill, which has side w ns I 8 and a removable coyer 20; houses a motorg driven booster generally designated 1.; The motor-driven booster 2| is energized anacontrolled by a cable 22 and preferably the arrangement is such that thebooster is energized only w en the iner closes the push-button switch 15. Fig; 2 shows-a wiring diagrafn to p'l'oyid'e the desired synchronous control One-side of a battery 'or other electroniotive source 23 is connected by iaw'ire' 25 to one t mmer the push-button fell- 15, and the other side is connected by a wi'reitto one terminal of the solenoid-operated mechani m 11 and to one terminal or a motors] that; boosts-the ammunit on belt. 1 The second contact-6f the-pus h-b'utton switch If is connected by a wire 28 to the second terminal of thesole mid-operated mechanism l1 and to the second terminal of the motoril. e

Asshown in Figs; 3 and}4, each cartridge 39' for the machine gunhas a' cylindrical shell 3]; that tapers to a redueed diameter to embrace a projectile 3 2; Thecartridgesj 30 are garnga by or intei eonnected by adisl-ntegrating arrimuni tioh belt generally designated 33 the ammunisequence from the belt 33 in the course of rapid I fire, the individual links 35 are automatically released and discarded.

The motor-driven booster 2| includes a primary cylindrical roller 40 and a secondary'cylindrical roller 4| rotatably mounted thereon, the secondary roller being the shorter and being formed with shallow peripheral grooves 62 at its opposite ends. Each of the grooves 42 is partly occupied by a ring 43 that tightly embraces the secondary roller and is adapted to engage the ammunition belt. In my preferred construction the two rings 43 are formed with teeth 45 to mesh with the cartridges, as indicated in Fig. 4, and are made of sponge rubber so that the teeth are momentarily .fiexed or deformed whenever the travel of the ammunition belt momentarily lags behind the rotation of the two rings.

One feature of my invention is the concept of employing the described cylindrical rollers .48 and 4! in combination with a resilient operative connection therebetween by means of which the primary roller40 drives the secondary roller 41 in a manner to permit appreciable variation in the relative speed of the secondary roller. Various form of resilient driving connection may be employed, but I prefer to use a resilient sleeve 45 of rubber or'like material at each end of the pair of rollers. As best shown in Fig. 3, each resilient sleeve 46 may be formed with an inner annular rib 41 to embrace the corresponding groove 52 of the secondary roller and may be formed with a second annular rib 48 to embrace the primary roller 40. this latter rib having an inwardly directed flange 50 to overhang the end of the primary roller.

It is apparent that there are two yielding means in the chain of driving connection between the primary roller 40 and the ammunition belt, one yielding means being the pair of rings 43 with their flexible teeth 45 and the other yielding means being the pair of resilient sleeves 46. If the ammunition belt is momentarily retarded, the teeth 45 flex to an appreciable extent and the two rubber sleeves 46 are distorted to a greater rotational extent, the two effects being such that the primary roller 40 may continue to rotate at substantially uniform speed while the ammunition belt is intermittently retarded and accelerated. It is to be noted that the fiexure of the teeth 45 and the yielding torque distortion of the resilient sleeves 46 represent potential energy, and this energy, which is stored when the ammunition belt is momentarly retarded, is released when a peak of energy is desired to overcome the inertia of the retarded ammunition belt and to accelerate the belt toward the machine gun.

Inside the primary cylindrical roller 40 is a suitable motor 5| supported at its opposite ends by a pair of brackets 52 and 53, the brackets being mounted by screws 55 on the side walls is of the ammunition box. A cylindrical end portion 56 of the motor 5| is threaded onto the bracket 52, and at the other end a cylindrical gear box 51 unitary with the motor fits into a complementary circular recess 58 in the bracket 53. To prevent rotation of the concentrically mounted motor an oil-center machine screw 60 may extend through the bracket 53 into the gear box 57. The cylindrical end portion 56 of the motor is embraced by a roller bearing 6| for rotary support of one end of the primary roller 49, and the bracket 53 is embraced by a second roller bearing 62 for the other end of the primary .roller.

The motor 5i drives a train of reduction gearing (not shown) in the circular gear box 51, the gear train ending in a pinion 63 that protrudes through a peripheral slot 65 in the gear box. Meshed with the pinion 53 is a ring gear 66 that functions as part of an overrunning clutch, the overrunning clutch including a clutch ring 68 that is fixed to the inner circumference of the primary roller 40 and also including four small rollers 70. In a Well known manner the small rollers 10 are housed in inclined recesses ii in the periphery of the ring gear 65 so that the small rollers 10 efiect engagement between the ring gear and the clutch ring when the ring gear tends to gain on the clutch ring in the direction of rotation indicated by the arrow in Fig. 4. If the motor should fail, however, or for any other reason tend to lag behind the rotation of the clutch ring 68, the small rollers HI drop back to the deeper ends of the inclined recesses 7| out of engagement with the clutch ring to free the clutch ring of the load of the motor.

The manner in which my invention operates will be readily understood from the foregoing description. The difference between operating the machine gun with the cooperation of the booster and without the cooperation of the booster amounts to fifty to two hundred shots per minute. In addition to speeding up the rate of fire, the booster decreases failures of the firing mechanism of the gun in battle.

The preferred practice of my invention described herein in detail for the purpose of disclosure and to illustrate the principles involved will suggest various changes and modifications under the basic concept, and I reserve the right to all such departures from my description that properly lie within the scope of the following claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a booster device of the character described, the combinationof: a cylindrical primary rotary means providing a motor cavity; a cylindrical secondary rotary means journalled on said primary rotary means, said secondary rotary means being adapted to engage a device to be driven thereby; resilient means yieldingly interconnecting said two rotary means; a motor in said motor cavity; and means operatively connecting said motor in'driving relation with said primary rotary means, said motor being housed in the primary rotary means.

2. In a device'for boosting a belt-like structure in its longitudinal movement along a predetermined path, the combination of: a sleeve having a longitudinal axis; means for journalling said sleeve to rotate about said axis; a motor within said sleeve; means for operatively connecting said motor to said sleeve in driving relationship; another sleeve rotatable relative to said first sleeve about said axis and adapted to operatively engage such a belt-like structure, said sleeves providing portions spaced from each other; and resilient means connecting said portionsto farm a resilient drive means for driving said other sleeve upon rotation of said first..- named sleeve.

a booster device .of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unitya cylindrical sleeve enclosing said motor unit and concentric therewith; bear.- ing means between said sleeve and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; clutch means at one .endof said motor unitxin said sleeve andoperatively connecting the same; tubular sprocket meanscarried by said sleeve and concentric therewith; and a re, silient driving means connecting said sleeve and said sprocket; means. whereby rotation of said sleeve rotates said driving means and in turn said sprocket means.

4. In a booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve enclosing said motor unitand concentric therewith; hearing means between said sleeve and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; clutchmeans at one end of said motor unit in said sleeve and operatively connecting the same; tubular sprocket means carried by said sleeve and concentric therewith, said sprocket means being of less length-than said sleeve so that one end of said sleeve extends out of said sn ockct.rneems; and an ular resilient driving means c nnectin on end said sleeve and said o ke m ans, an nclosin said x n :irlg end of'said sl'eve, whereby rotation of said sleeve. ro a s a i driv n means d in turn said sp ocket m an .5, In boo t r dev ce the a a t r d cribed, th combination o n enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a; cyli ndric al sleeve enclosing said motor unit andconcentrictherewith; bearns: m ans between.. aid s e e a i motor unit for no m 4 e1at e otat t tween; 'clutch means at, one end of said motor unit in said sleeve and operatively connecting the same; tubular sprocket means carried by said sleeve and concentric. therewith, said sprocket means being of less. length. than said sleeve so that both ends. of said sleeve extend out of said sprocketmeans; and apair oiresilient driving means each of which is annular in form, each enclosing one extending end of said sleeve and connected between such end and said sprocket means, whereby rotation of said sleeve rotates said driving means and in turn said sprocket means. i

6. In a booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve enclosing said motor unitand concentric therewith; bearing means between said sleeve and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; clutch means at one end of said motor unit in said sleeve and operatively connecting the same; tubular sprocket means carried by said sleeve and'concentric therewith, said sprocket means being of less length than said sleeve so that both ends-of said sleeve extend out of said sprocket means; and a pair of resilient driving means each of which is annular in form enclosing one extending end of said sleeve and connected between such end and said sprocket means, each of said driving means being impervious to foreign material to prevent the entry thereof between said sleeve and said sprocket means, whereby rotation of said sleeve rotates 6 said driving means and in turn said sprocket means.

7. In a, booster device of the character de: scribed, the combination of an enclosed cylins drical motorunit; a, cylindrical sleeve, enclosing said motor unit and concentric therewith, one end of said sleeve extending beyond an adjacent end of said motor unit; a. member having a cyline drical surface extending into said one end of said sleeve and concentric therewith, said meme ber being secured to said adjacent end. Q'f said motor unit so. as to. provide a space therebetween; bearing means disposed between said sleeve and said surface and within said sleeve. so as to rotatably supportsaid one, end of said sleeve on said member; clutch means in said space and operatively connecting said motor unit and; sleeve, whereby actuation of said motor'unit rotates said sleeve relative thereto; tubular sprocket means journalled on said sleeve. for rotation relative thereto; and annular resilient driving means on said sleeve operatively connecting said sleeve with said sprocket means,

8 In a. booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylinrdrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve enclosing said motor unit vand concentric therewith, one end of said sleeve extending beyond an-adjacent end of said motor unit; a; member having; a cylindrical surface extending into said one end of said sleeve and concentric therewith said member beingsecured to said adjacent endof said motor unit so, as to provide a space therebetween, said member-substantiallyclosing said one end of said sleeve; bearing means disposed between said sleeve and said surface and within said sleeve so as to rotatably support said one end of said sleeve on said member; clutch means in said space and operatively connecting said motor unit and sleeve, whereby actuation of said motor unit rotates said sleeve relative thereto; tubular sprocket means journalled on said sleeve for rotaticn relative thereto; and annular resilient driving means on, said sleeve :operatively connecting said sleeve with said sprocket means.

9. In a booster device. of the character dc:- scrlbed, the combination of: an enclosed; cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve, enclosing said motor unit and concentric therewith, one end of said sleeve extending beyond an adjacent end of said motor unit; a first member having a cylindrical surface extending into said one end of said sleeve and concentric therewith, said member being secured to said adjacent end of said motor unit so as to provide a space therebetween, said first member substantially closing said one end of said sleeve; bearing means disposed between said sleeve and said surface and within said sleeve so as to rotatably support said one end of said sleeve on said member; clutch means in said space and operatively connecting said motor unit and sleeve, wherebyactuation of said motor unit rotates said sleeve relative thereto; tubular sprocket means journalled on said sleeve for rotation relative thereto; annular resilient driving means on said sleeve operatively connecting said sleeve with said sprocket means; and a second member secured to the other end of said motor unit and substantially closing the other end of said sleeve.

10. In a booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve enclosing said motor unit and concentric therewith; bearing means between said sleeve and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; means in said sleeve operatively connecting said motor unit and said sleeve; tubular sprocket means carried by said sleeve and concentric therewith, said sprocket means being of less length than said sleeve so that one end of said sleeve extends out of said sprocket means; and an annular resilient driving means connecting said one end of said sleeve and said sprocket means and enclosing said extending end of said sleeve, whereby rotation of said sleeve rotates said driving means and in turn said sprocket means.

11. In a booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve enclosing .said motor unit and concentric therewith; bearing means between said sleeve and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; means in said sleeve-operatively connecting said motor unit and said sleeve; tubular sprocket means carried by said sleeve and concentric therewith, said sprocket means being of less length than said sleeve so that one end of said sleeve extends out of said sprocket means;

and a tubular resilient driving means connecting said one end of said sleeve and said sprocket means and enclosing said extending end of said sleeve, whereby rotation of said sleeve rotates said driving means and in turn said sprocket means, said driving means being formed so as to prevent the entry of dust therethrough between said sleeve and said sprocket means.

12. In a booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve enclosing said motor unit and concentric therewith; bearing means between said sleeve and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; means in said sleeve operatively connecting said motor unit and said sleeve; tubular sprocket means carried by said sleeve and concentric therewith, said sprocket means being of less length than said sleeve so that the ends of said sleeve extend out of said sprocket means; and a pair of annular resilient driving means, each of which connects one of the ends of said sleeve and said sprocket means and encloses said extending and of said sleeve, whereby rotation of said sleeve rotates said driving means and in turn said sprocket means. r

13. In a booster device of the character described, the combination of: an enclosed cylindrical motor unit; a cylindrical sleeve member enclosing said motor unit and concentric therewith; bearing means between said sleeve member and said motor unit for permitting relative rotation therebetween; means for operatively connecting said motor unit and said sleeve member whereby operation of said motor unit can rotate said sleeve member; a tubular sprocket member enclosing said sleeve member and -concentric therewith, one of said members having an end extending axially beyond an end of the other of said member; and an annular resilient driving means connecting said ends and concentric with said members, whereby rotation of said sleeve member is adapted to rotate said driving means and in turn said sprocket means.

CLAUDE C. SLATE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,352,891 Green Sept. 14, 1920 2,180,751 Wagner Nov. 21, 1939 1,842,446 Dabrasky Jan. 26, 1932 1,290,852 Sturgeon Jan. 7, 1919 1,399,440 Payne Dec. 6, 1921 2,366,395 Hall Jan. 2, 1945 2,342,065 Trotter et a1. Feb. 15, 1944 1,501,187 Rayfield July 15, 1924 2,174,010 Patterson Sept. 26, 1939 2,174,223 Frauenthal et a1. Sept. 26, 1939 1,235,734 Stange Aug. 7, 1917 2,003,029 Albersheim May 28, 1935 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 486,684 Great Britain June 9, 1938 690,426 France June 17, 1930 520,397 Great Britain Apr. 23, 1940 502,948 Great Britain Mar. 28, 1939

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559714 *27 Jun 194610 Jul 1951United Shoe Machinery CorpGun turret
US2596293 *29 Nov 194713 May 1952Mach Tool Works Oerlikon AdminCartridge feeding mechanism for the magazines of automatic firearms
US2629287 *10 Jan 194824 Feb 1953Hughes Tool CoAntirollback brake for ammunition boosters
US2629288 *10 Oct 194724 Feb 1953Hughes Tool CoAntirollback brake for boosters
US2756636 *18 Jul 195031 Jul 1956Hughes Tool CoAdjustable ammunition booster sprockets
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Classifications
U.S. Classification89/33.5, 89/33.16, 89/33.1
International ClassificationF41A9/51, F41A9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A9/51
European ClassificationF41A9/51