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Publication numberUS2070721 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date16 Feb 1937
Filing date14 Aug 1936
Priority date14 Aug 1936
Publication numberUS 2070721 A, US 2070721A, US-A-2070721, US2070721 A, US2070721A
InventorsDonald Feight Charles
Original AssigneeDonald Feight Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Catapult
US 2070721 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16, 1937. c. D. FEIGHT CATAPULT Filed Aug. 14, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 JIHMWHHHW Feb. 16, 1937. c FElGHT 2,070,721

CATAPULT Filed Aug. 14, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 w m r M Inventor A itorneys Feb. 16, 1937. c. D. FEIGHT 2,070,721

' CATAPULT Filed Aug. 14, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Inventor ajjg gf By Jim W Afiorneys Patented Feb. 16, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CATAPULT enarles Donald Feight, Glassport, Pa. Application August 14, 1936, Serial No. 96,109 Y 5 Claims. (01. 244-63) This invention appertains to new and useful improvements in catapults and more particularly to a. novel apparatus for projecting aerial toys such as toy aeroplanes.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus which is used to simulate the catapulting of aeroplanes in a manner which will have a marked resemblance to the take-off of aeroplanes from an aviation field.

Another important object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the character stated which will be substantially fool-proof in operation and not susceptible to the development of undeterminable defects.

These and various other important objects of the invention will become apparent to the. reader of the following specification.

In the drawings:-

Figure 1 represents a top plan view'of the apparatus.

Figure 2 represents a front elevational view of the structure.

Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view through the apparatus.

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional view.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary detailed sectional view taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view through the trip means of the apparatus.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view on the line |l of Figure 4.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary elevational view of the vertical pulley-gear shown in Figure 3.

Referring to the drawings wherein like numerals designate like parts, it can be seen that numeral 5 represents the base of the apparatus which is provided with upstanding end walls 6-45 and side Walls 1. The numeral 8 represents a house-like structure mounted upon one end of the aforementioned structure and simulating an aeroplane hangar. Numeral 9 represents the top of the structure which corresponds to the takeoff field and which has an opening [0 therein within the housing 8 above which the turntable II is located. This turntable II is carried by the shaft l2 on which is located the bevel gear l3 with which the bevel gear I4 on the shaft 15 meshes. This shaft I5 is journaled through one side wall 1 and is equipped with a crank handle 16. Between the side walls 1-1, a shaft I! is journaled and has a pulley I8 thereon corresponding to the pulley ill on the gear l4 and a belt 20 is trained over the pulleys so that by rotating the shaft l5 the turntable II will be rotated as well as the shaft I'I. Bearing structures 2l-2I depending from the platform 9 support the idler shaft 22 with the-pulley 23 thereon. As is shown in Figure 3 the shaft I! also has the pulley 24 and over these pulleys 23--24 is trained the elongated endless belt 25.

Overlying the belt 25, the platform 9 is provided with a longitudinal extending slot 26 through which the pins 21 on the forward end of the toy aeroplane 28 depends.

Guide plates 2929 are provided at the sides of the belt 25 and extend above and below the flights of the belt as well as beyond the pulleys 23-24. These guide plates 29 serve as rails for the short cross-bar 30 and the long cross-bar 3|.

Figures 3 and 6 disclose the trip mechanism for these cross-bars which consists of a rod 32 disposed through the guide walls 29-29 and on which are the rockable arms 32, each provided with an upstanding portion 34 provided with a beveled head 35. Y

Bell cranks 36-36 are also mounted on the guide walls 2929 and each of these is provided with a beveled head 31. The adjacent ends of the arms 33 are provided with reduced extensions 38 with which the lower portions of the bell cranks 36 engage and these ends of the bell cranks are connected to the reduced portions 38 of the arms 33 by springs 39 so that they are inseparable.

The cross-bar 30 is secured to the belt 25 while the cross-bar 3| is free and is connected to the fixed cross-bar 30 by coiled extensible springs 40-40.

The connection of the block 30 to the belt 25 consists of spring members 4| extending from the cross-member 30' to the anchor 42 on the belt 25.

Rotatable posts 43-43 are provided on the platform 9 and each carries a lamp 44 at its upper end. The lower ends of these posts are equipped with pulleys 45 which are connected to the shaft H by belts or endless cables 46.

Upon the top of the house-like structure 8 is mounted a pivotal light or beacon 41.

It can now be seen, that a plurality of toy aeroplanes are mounted radially upon the turntable II and the crank I6 is turned. As the belt 25 rotates, the elongated cross-bar 3| will engage the pin 2'! to one of the toy aeroplanes 28 and carry the same down until it is stopped by the head 35 of the trip mechanism. The belt continues on until the cross-member 30 strikes the edge of the triggers 36 whereupon the rocket 33 rock so that the heads 35 are lowered and as the springs 4040 are now undertension, releasing of the cross-bars 3| will result in the forward snapping motion of the aeroplane as it is carried by the cross-bar 3| with the result that the plane will rise from the platform and soar into the air. 7

While the foregoing specification sets forth the invention in" speciflc terms, it is to be understood that numerous changes in the shape, size and materials may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed hereinafter.

means for tensioning the said cross-member and releasing the same at predetermined intervals of its travel.

2. A catapult of the character described comprising an endless belt, a cross-member, spring means for connecting the cross-member to the belt, means for feeding aerial projectiles so that they are engaged by the said cross-member, and means for tensioning the said cross-member and releasing the same at predetermined intervals of its travel, said last-mentioned means consisting of a second block secured to the belt, a rockable member having a beveled head portion for stopping the first-{mentioned cross member, and a trip for the said rockable member adapted to be operated by the second-mentioned crossmember.

3. A catapult of the character described comprising an endless belt, a cross-member, spring means for connecting the cross-member to the belt, means for feeding aerial projectiles so that they are engaged by the said cross-member, and means for tensioning the said cross-memberand releasing the same at predetermined intervals of its travel, said last-mentioned means consisting of a second block secured to the belt, a rockable member having a beveled head portion for stopping the first-mentioned cross member, and a trip for the said rockable member adapted to be operated by the second-mentioned cross mem ber, and a resilient connection between the lastmentioned cross-member and the belt.

4. A catapult of the character described comprising and endless belt, a cross-member, spring means for connecting the cross-member to the belt, means for feeding aerial projectiles so that they are engaged by the second cross-member, and means for tensioning the said cross-member and releasing the same at predetermined intervals of its travel, said feed means consisting of a turntable and single operating means. for rotating the turntable and actuating the said belt.

5. A catapult of the character described comprising an endless belt, a cross-member, spring means for connecting the cross-member to-the belt, means for feeding aerial projectiles so that they are engaged by the second cross-member, and means for tensioning the said cross-member and releasing the same at predetermined intervals of its travel, said feed means consisting of a turntable and single operating means for rotating the turntable and actuating the said belt, and a house-like structure having a doorway therein, said house-like structure serving as a housing for the said turntable.

CHARLES DONALD FEIGHT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2523314 *8 Feb 193826 Sep 1950Gross Frederick BFlush deck catapult
US2611355 *29 Jul 194923 Sep 1952Ashwood Norman DCatapult for launching model airplanes
US3408768 *5 May 19655 Nov 1968Marvin Glass & AssociatesToy airplane launching device
US5407149 *17 Sep 199318 Apr 1995Singhai; Tara C.Devices and means to engage in indoor flight of radio controlled model aircrafts
US662639926 Dec 200130 Sep 2003Lockheed Martin CorporationMiniature aircraft catapult
WO2003057334A1 *23 Dec 200217 Jul 2003Lockheed Martin CorporationMiniature aircraft catapult
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/63, 446/65, 124/16, 124/31
International ClassificationB64F1/06, B64F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64F1/06
European ClassificationB64F1/06